England

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Working woman avaOrdinary women in the 18th century had a lot of work to do. There were no washing machines, dishwashers, ultra modern kitchen equipment, and other conveniences that are available for a female today. So, working women or peasant women wore comfy but modest clothing. At the same time, their daily outfit was elegant, despite its simplicity and plainness. Let’s have a look at how the 18th-century working woman dressed up.

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Wedding dress avaHow did wedding gowns of English queens and princesses look like in the 19th and 20th centuries? What did they show to the public? And what about modern royal wedding dresses? Dr. Joanna Marschner, Senior Curator at Historic Royal Palaces, will tell us many curious things about these bridal outfits. Also, let’s enjoy the beauty of English royal wedding gowns.

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Wedding avaPractical ladies from the end of the 19th century often used their wedding dresses (or parts of the costume) several years after the wedding. It was worn as a visiting gown, an attire for special occasions, etc. So, how did those bridal dresses look? Let us have a peek at the 1880’s Natural Form era bridal gown. This one is ivory-colored, though dark colors were also very popular.

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Kid clothing avaVintage baby’s and kid’s clothing can be adoring. In the 17th, 18th, 19th, and even the beginning of the 20th century, such garments were handmade, which adds more charm to it. Here is a collection of children’s dresses, suits, caps, shoes, and even bibs from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. We guarantee you’d be moved by these garments.

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Baby clothing avaMost people know a lot (or at the very least something) about the traditional clothing and outfits from a certain century made for adults. Like Tudor era attire, Elizabethan gown, Baroque style costume, Medieval dress, etc. But how much do you know about the vintage kids’ clothes? And it is even more exciting to find out what the royal children wore. Let’s do just that – let’s look at the tiny outfits used by Queen Victoria's children in the 19th century.

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17century townswoman avaWhat did ordinary English townswomen of the 17th century look like? What did they wear, which accessories chose? How could you tell the difference between a poor and a wealthy woman? Let’s look at the middle class, circa 1650 woman. An affluent townswoman, maybe a merchant’s wife?.. Here are the pieces of clothing her attire consisted of.

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Elizabethan Lady avaThe Elizabethan lady’s dress (1570-1580) was very modest, elegant, and even royal-looking. It had many layers of garments made from different fabrics. Oh, and by the way, the underwear items of this period were comfortable and more flexible than ordinary whalebone corsets. So, let us have a look what exactly is lurking underneath all that silk velvet of an Elizabethan attire.

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Edwardian lady avaThe Edwardian era clothing is comparatively simple by design and elegant. No bustles or crinolines, no super-wide skirts, and no extremely puffy sleeves. Instead, the women’s Edwardian gown is characterized by flowing fabrics, plenty of lace, light colors of the garments, and large hats decorated with flowers. So, the visiting gown from 1903 – let us see what lies underneath all that silk and lace.

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Ladygarment18She puts on her clothes, with help in a particular order, including, a shift, stays, petticoats, pockets, roll, stockings and garters, gown and stomacher, apron and shoes.

The shift was the undergarment worn next to the skin.
Made from linen, it was washable and protected the clothes from bodily moisture and the body from the possibly harsh textiles being worn.