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Medieval avaThe Middle Ages is one of the most interesting, scandalous, and favorable by a lot of people period in our history. So many of us know at least something about medieval traditions, clothing, and lifestyle. A lot of reenactors study this era. But there are still dozens of myths regarding everything medieval. Partially because this period was a long time ago, but also, we don’t have nearly enough available info and what we have is often distorted and misleading. Anyway, let’s bust some myths about medieval clothing!

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Kersetka avaIn Ukrainian traditional costume, there is a garment with the most perfect design ever. It is a bodice called “kersetka” or “korsetka”, and it is so special because the cut fits ideally a pregnant and not pregnant woman at the same time. Meaning that a woman can wear the same bodice for years, throughout pregnancy, during breastfeeding, and long after the birth of her baby. She didn’t need any specific maternity clothing. Besides, this bodice is designed so that it sits perfectly on the body, accentuates the curves, and is very comfortable to wear even in daily life.

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Swedish dress avaGeographically, Sweden is one of the Scandinavian countries, so its national costumes have a lot of features in common with neighboring Norway, Denmark, etc. But there is a number of differences that make Swedish folk outfits unique. We’ll tell you about some of them in this material. Discover the beauty of folk dress in Sweden with us. Let’s look at these top-5 curious facts about Swedish traditional clothing.

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Hawaiian bangles avaHawaiian culture is wonderful. It’s much deeper than you see from the first glance. And Hawaiian clothing and jewelry traditions can easily surprise you. For example, did you know that Hawaiian traditional metal bangles with engraved text and patterns originate from 19th-century England? Of course, before that, Hawaiian people used authentic jewels and adornments (made from natural materials, like wood, seashells, beads, etc), but these metal bangles became a large and significant part of the local culture and heritage. They’re not just baubles, but lovely jewelry pieces that tell a story.

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Panniers avaIn the 1600s and 1700s in Europe, the fashionable female silhouette looked rather odd for a modern observer. The ladies wore skirts that extended far to the side but were practically flat at the front and back, sort of like a squashed cylinder. This shape was not too comfortable for daily use, but who would argue with fashion trends?! And also, there was one particular super important advantage of such a shape. What was it?

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Bohuslav loom avaIn one of the Ukrainian museums, there is an old weaving loom that still works just fine and any visitor can try working on it. The museum is situated in a small town Bohuslav near Kyiv. This authentic loom dates back to the mid or end of the 19th century, and it has a lot of lovely details. Bohuslav was one of the cultural and handicraft centers in Ukraine, specializing in weaving. It even has its own traditional weaving technique. So, thousands of people who want to learn weaving on a vintage loom come to this little but picturesque town.

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Tailcoat avaTailcoats were a very popular garment among the 19th-century gentlemen. So much so that we have a large pile of information about them and a number of vintage examples that survived to our day and can be seen in museums, private collections, exhibitions, photos, and various other sources. And no surprise there – a tailcoat looks elegant and regal, it adds a lot of grace to the posture of any man (at least when we’re talking about evening tailcoats). So, what’s so special about the cut, style, decorations of a tailcoat? What fabrics were used to make it in the early 1800s? And how did the design changed throughout the years?

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Mukluks avaInuit people traditionally made practically all of their clothing, footwear, and accessories from animal skins and fur – simply because it was pretty much impossible to import fabrics or grow such plants as flax, hemp, cotton, etc in Alaska. And the weather in the northern regions is very cold, so only wool and fur were able to protect the body. Inuit traditional shoes look great and are extremely warm – much warmer than any modern materials. Let’s see how this footwear is made.

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Uzbek girls avaThe main Uzbek folk garment traditionally used by everybody in this country was a robe. These open garments could be made from different fabrics, adorned with various decorations and details, created in different designs, but they suited men, women, and children in Uzbekistan perfectly. Of course, every region or even town had its own peculiarities in traditional fashion, but a robe of some style was an obligatory part of an outfit. Also, there are several curious and unique features of folk clothing for children in Uzbekistan. Find out about them below.

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Bonnet avaSwedish national attire, worn by the local women, always included some kind of a headdress. Traditionally, there was a huge variety of headpieces, depending on the region, social class and status, financial capability, occasion, and so on. But one of the most favored headdresses of Swedish married women was a crisp white linen bonnet – a lovely accessory that made women look elegant and festive. Though, in modern times, it reminds us a lot of a nurse’s or nun’s outfit.

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Fichu avaIn the 1700s, women dressed rather modestly and very doll-like. Particularly in the 1730s and 1740s, they looked like pretty human-sized dolls. One of the loveliest female accessories invented in Europe in the 18th century was a kerchief or delicate shawl called “fichu”. It covered women’s low neckline but in a very intriguing way, as fichus often were made from delicate semi-transparent lace. This cute accessory quickly gained popularity and was favored by women for years and years after.

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tortoise fibula avaVikings used a wide variety of brooches called “fibula” in their outfits. Such jewelry items were used instead of buttons, hooks, and zippers, which weren’t invented yet. And some of these fibulae are works of art, real masterpieces that impress us even today. Among them are so-called “tortoise fibulae” or “turtle brooches” or “oval fibulae” – large and intricately designed brooches worn by Scandinavian women.

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Ukrainian embroidery avaEmbroidering is one of the most widespread and common for various corners of our planet traditional crafts. People have been using embroidery to decorate their clothes for millennia and on every continent. Of course, there are some similar or identical embroidery techniques and patterns, but others are unique and represent a certain country, region, or even community. Sometimes, you can easily tell where a costume came from by its needlework designs alone. So, let’s look at different embroidery samples from various countries around the world. How much do they look alike?

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Udeng avaThe importance of this Balinese headdress for the local religious ceremonies is bigger and more interesting than you might think. White udeng headpiece is worn by Indonesian men when they’re worshiping their gods in the temples – it covers the head and prevents people from losing hairs in these sacred places, which is considered the violation of a temple. So, udeng is much more than just a traditional headwear in Bali. What else curious and symbolic features does the udeng headscarf has?