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Elderly Women avaHere you are over 40 old black&white photos of women who still remembered the 18th century. This is your chance to see the variety of headdresses of elderly women who usually are the tradition keepers. These beautiful lace bonnets, created to emphasize the aristocraticism and sophistication, make these females look so adorable and sweet! Also, you’ll be able to distinguish dress cuts and designs, different shawls, lace collars and cuffs, lace gloves, and many other marvelous peculiarities of elderly women’s clothing in the first half of the 19th century.

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Lithuania2 avaLithuanian folk costumes differ from region to region but the main characteristics and general appearance remain more or less the same. The real beauty of these traditional outfits is seen through the details on them. Embroidery, beading, crochet and lacemaking, weaving, jewelry making, etc – these are some of the traditional clothing crafts that indicate Lithuania and help to distinguish its folk costume from any other in the world. We’d like to show you several examples of Lithuanian male and female folk clothing.

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Outlander avaThis is the next article of the stage costumes series. This time, we’ll talk about the movie “Outlander” and Scottish traditional costumes used in it (at least in the first season of this serial). Folk clothing experts gave their opinion on how accurate the stage costumes of “Outlander” are. Also, we will find out what we should know about that historical period – the 18th century – and how the clothing articles for this show were created. First of all, let’s discuss the general info about the Outlander tartans.

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Turkish2 avaA short time ago, we’ve published the first portion of old photos of Turkish traditional outfits from a rather large collection. Here is the second portion of photos. Even more authentic men’s, women’s, and kids’ Turkish costumes from the second half of the 19th century. Even more of extraordinary accessories, weapons, jewels, etc. It’s a pity, these photos are black&white so you can’t distinguish the color palette of the garments and most of embellishments. Nevertheless, we can see the cut and design, forms and shapes of these clothing articles.

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Lady avaThe mid-19th century was a period when women still wore corsets and layers of petticoats. By the way, 1848 is the year when the stud & slot fastening on corsets was patented. Since that time, women often used split busk corsets with stud closure at the front. Since the crinoline is not yet invented, ladies use corded petticoats to create the fashionable shape of a skirt. So, let’s see a wealthy middle-class woman from 1848 getting ready to go out for a walk. We’ll find out the details of her outfits.

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Lithuania avaLithuanian traditional clothing is rather modest and warm; it covers most of the body, usually leaving only hands and face open. And this can be explained by the specific chilly climate of the country. Most of the garments are made from linen and wool, hand-produced by the local people. Also, the traditional dress in Lithuania is very ornate – adorned with embroidery, lacework, crochet, interweaving, knitting, and other techniques. These clothing pieces often have rather archaic characteristics, designs, and patterns.

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Turkish avaWe’ve found a large collection of vintage photos of Turkish folk costumes from the end of the 19th century. And we’d like to share them with you. Unfortunately, these are black&white photos so you can’t distinguish the color palette of the garments and most of the ornamentation. But still, we can see the cut, design, and shapes of Turkish multilayered male, female, and kid costumes, their awesome accessories (often, pretty bizarre, too). So, here is the first portion of photos.

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Fashion avaThe mid-19th century is the end of the era of the Industrial Revolution – transition from hand production methods to machine manufacture. This period in European history is rather complicated and connected to very hard labor. And as fashion is always a response to the happening events, lifestyle, and social activities, the 1830s-40s’ fashion reflected the Industrial Revolution. Let’s see what we’re talking about. Let’s take a closer look at male and female clothes of this period.

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Loom avaIn this article and video, an American master weaver will tell us a little about a barn loom that was used to make coarse linen for slaves’ clothing. This loom is exhibited at Mount Vernon, in Virginia, the US. And by the way, Virginian weaving looms differ somewhat from other linen looms – you can read about it below. Also, this is your chance to watch a 200-years-old American weaving loom in work.

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Edvardian era w avaLately, we’ve published a collection of old photos of Edwardian-era little girls. And now, we’re continuing this topic by vintage photos of young women from the same period. These photos show how women looked like in 1890s-1918s. Notice their natural silhouettes, pretty hairstyles, flowing fabrics of their dresses, and delicate jewelry pieces. Though, some of these girls look rather eccentric.

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Hutsul avaThe Hutsul clothing tradition is interesting because of its peculiarities and uniquity. Local craftsmen were (and still are) especially skilled in working with leather and metal. We’ve already written about Ukrainian traditional jewelry made from brass. And now, we’d like to talk about folk clothing accessories used in the Carpathian region – ornate leather shoes, belts, and bags. These pieces are so very beautiful and remarkable that we can’t miss the opportunity to show them to you.

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Linen avaLinen is, possibly, the most eco-friendly and naturally comfortable fabric in the world. The clothes and household items made from linen were being used by our ancestors for ages. It is said that the oldest piece of linen-like fabric is dated 36,000 years ago. And today, we still grow flax, produce linen cloth, and use this fabric in our everyday life. So, what actually is linen? How is it made? And why is this material so valuable that no modern synthetic fabrics can replace or supplant it?

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Shemagh avaWe would like to share with you a nice tutorial on how to wear the Emirati shemagh. In the video, you’ll see that the tutor uses the “Shall Omani” (Omani headwrap) rather than the Emirati shemagh. That’s because the fabric of shall Omani is thicker and so the details are better visible. But you can do the same with your shemagh or ghutra. The shemagh (also called keffiyeh, kufiya, ghutrah, hattah, mashadah, chafiye, dastmal yazdi, or cemedani) is the traditional Middle Eastern men’s headdress.

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Edwardian Era avaThe Edwardian era is a period in British history from the 1890s to World War I (1914-18). The kids’ fashion during this historic period is marked by natural flowing hairstyles, elegant and delicate outfits, and flowers as a decoration. By the way, for grown-up women, this era was the last time they wore corsets in everyday life. Step by step, the clothing of females, including little girls, transferred from artificial and pompous to natural and flowing. We’ve prepared 21 old photos (though, colorized in modern times) so that you could see for yourself how an Edwardian-era little girl looked like.