User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active
 

Haiti avaThe design of folk costumes in the Caribbean is based on the culture and customs of African countries (the motherland for thousands of slaves that were brought to Caribbean islands) mixed with some features of European colonizers’ outfits. This clothing, especially the female dresses, has African charm and European modesty. Local women still wear these dresses in day-to-day life and for festive celebrations. Today, we’ll show you the beauty of Dominica’s, Jamaican, Puerto Rican, and Haitian female outfits.

The traditional West Indian dresses were fashioned by slaves who took influences from their West African roots and their European colonizers. Slaves and free Black women would wear these dresses on Sundays and feast days. Throughout the Caribbean, West Indian traditional wear varies in its design, style, and symbolism. Today, the traditional outfits are worn at Independence celebrations, cultural festivals, and parades.

 

Dominica

The “jip” and the “wob dwiyet” are the folk garments of Dominica. The wob dwiyet is much older and uses a large amount of fabric. The jip is younger and preferred by the Dominica’s youth. Basically, it consists of a white blouse with open neck and a lot of frills and a skirt made from madras cloth. The skirt called “jupe” is often worn over an ankle-length petticoat called “jupon”. The madras cloth, originating in India, was used to make the traditional dresses throughout the Caribbean.

Dominica2

Ornate jewelry would be worn to adorn the clothing.

Dominica1

The headdress of Dominica is a unique item. The number of peaks on the headpiece holds a specific symbolism – they show the availability of this particular woman. For example, one or four peaks mean that you can ask her on a date, while three peaks mean that she is in a relationship.

 

Jamaica

The traditional garment in Jamaica is called “bandana skirt” and is made of red&white madras worn with a white ruffled blouse. Originally, it was worn to dance the quadrille, a dance performed throughout the Caribbean.

Jamaica2

Jamaica1

The local females use a headscarf made from matching madras cloth. During slavery, the headscarf protected enslaved women from the harsh rays of the sun. Today, it serves the same purpose and also makes a nice supplement to the costume.

Jamaica3

To learn more about Jamaican folk attire, read this article: Traditional clothing of Jamaica. Modest dresses from bandana fabric and shoes from washed-up materials.

 

Puerto Rico

In Puerto Rico, women wear a so-called “bomba skirt” as a folk attire. The bomba skirt is a really extraordinary garment. The skirt and music genre, la bomba, derived from West African slaves in Puerto Rico. La bomba served as active resistance against slavery and was a symbol of spirituality.

Puerto Rico1

Puerto Rico2

The bomba costume consists of a long and wide flowing skirt, a blouse (often short and ruffled), and an optional headdress. The turban serves as a headpiece; young girls often use flowers in their hair instead.

 

Haiti

The karabela dress, also known as the quadrille dress in other areas of the Caribbean, is the traditional female garment of Haiti. Usually, this dress is very bright, festive, and made using a lot of fabric. In most cases, the karabela dress has a ruffled, open-neck top and a wide flowing bottom. The red and blue colors of the Haitian flag are almost always incorporated in the costume.

Haiti1

The headscarf may be either red or blue. The alternative to the headscarf is a straw hat. Straw hats were worn by slaves throughout the Caribbean for further protection from the sun.

Haiti2

Haiti3


We’ve covered only 4 countries of the Caribbean islands. But this doesn’t mean that other folk costumes of the Caribbean are less worthy or interesting. We’ll talk about them in the following articles.


(c) Lyndsay Elizabeth

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk_GAYSRVG0

Add comment

Every culture has features and peculiarities, familiar only to the people of this nation. And it’s very interesting to learn about traditional clothing from natives. That’s why if you have something to say about your national costume, please, do it using comments. Tell us things which you know about your country’s cultural heritage. Other people will discover something new for them thanks to you.

Security code
Refresh