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A ZTraditional pieces of the male and female national costumes in Korea: ayam, ayngsam, baji, beoseon, binyeo, bokgeon, cheupji, cheolick, chima, chima jeogori, danghye, dangui, dansokgot, darisokgot, deot jeogori, dongjeong, durumagi, gache, gat, gil, git, gojengi, gongbok, goreum, gulle, gun, gunbok, gwanbok, hanbok, heoritti, hogeon, hwal-ot, hwangpo, jebok, jeogori, jeokui, jeonbok, jobok, jokduri, jokki, joseon-oth, juchaui, jumagui, jungchimak, juui, kkachi durumagi, kunghye, magoja, magwae, myeonbok, norigae, obangjang durumagi, onhye, po, ramie, sang, sangbok, sangtu, seolbim, sokchima, soksokgot, sonjjang, wonsam, and yungbok.

Ayam – female winter cap used in the Joseon period (1392 – 1910). This headdress covers the forehead, temples, partially ears, and part of the head, but the crown of the head is left open. Ayam is similar to a wide headband.

Ayngsam – formal outfit for students. It was worn during the national government exam and governmental ceremonies.

Baji – Korean traditional male trousers. Baji is a part of men’s hanbok. They are loose-fitting. Today, this term is used for any pants in Korea.

Beoseon – traditional socks worn with hanbok.

Binyeo (pinyeo) – female accessory; ornamental hairpin. The design of this item can show the social status of a woman.

Bokgeon – kids peaked fabric hat; boy’s headdress.

Cheupji (cheop-ji) – hair accessory for royal court women used during the late Joseon Dynasty. It is a small accessory worn on the top of the head. It is often made in a shape of a bird, dragon, butterfly, etc.

Cheolick – Korean traditional garment adopted from Mongolia. It is a kind of a tunic – blouse and kilt sewn togeter.

Chima – traditional wide wrap-around skirt. Usually, it is a rectangular piece of cloth pleated or gathered into a skirt band. It can be also called “sang” or “gun”.

Chima jeogori – Korean folk women’s costume. It consists of a chima (wrap-around skirt) and a jeogori (blouse or jacket).

Danghye (tanghye) – shoes used by married women of the Joseon dynasty. They are decorated with embroidery.

Dangui (tangwi) – ceremonial robe of high-class females, the Joseon dynasty.

Dansokgot – women’s undergarment used in day-to-day life in the 19th century. It made the skirt fuller.

Darisokgot – female undergarment used in day-to-day life in the 19th century. It made the skirt fuller.

Deot jeogori – outer jacket adopted from the Manchu people in the end of the 19th century. Also called “magoja” or “magwae”.

Dongjeong – removable white collar; part of the jeogori (upper part of the hanbok) garment. It is a unisex piece of clothing.

Durumagi – traditional overcoat for cold weather.

Gache – large female wig that was very popular until the 19th century.

Gat – male horsehair hat. It was a part of the hanbok during the Joseon period. This headdress has a bamboo frame and is made from the horsehair. The shape is, usually, cylindrical, with brims.

Gil – part of the jeogori (upper part of the hanbok) garment; large section of jeogori on both front and back sides.

Git – part of the jeogori (upper part of the hanbok) garment; band of fabric that trims the collar.

Gojengi – women’s undergarment used in day-to-day life in the 19th century. It made the skirt fuller.

Gongbok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials). Gongbok was worn when officers had an audience with the king at the palace.

Goreum – coat-strings used to tie the jeogori (upper part of the hanbok). Traditionally, the strings were short and narrow.

Gulle – little girl’s headdress, beautifully decorated with ribbons, tassels, and other embellishments. It was worn by girls 1-5 years old.

Gun – traditional wide wrap-around skirt. Usually, it is a rectangular piece of cloth pleated or gathered into a skirt band. It can be also called “sang” or “chima”.

Gunbok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials).

Gwanbok – formal attire used by Korean government officials. There were different designs of a gwanbok (gongbok, gunbok, jebok, jobok, sangbok, yungbok, etc.) according to its purpose.

Hanbok – the most well-known Korean folk garment. The name “hanbok” is used in the South Korea. It is a semi-formal or formal outfit. Male hanbok includes a shirt or jacket called “jeogori” and loose-fitting trousers called “baji”. Female hanbok includes a blouse or jacket called “jeogori” as well and a skirt called “chima”. In North Korea, this garment is called “joseon-oth”.

Heoritti – piece of fabric worn around the breasts by women. In the 18th century, it was an undergarment worn beneath the jeogori; later, it became an outerwear and was worn on top of the jeogori.

Hogeon – boy’s traditional headdress; peaked cloth hat with a tiger pattern.

Hwal-Ot – full dress used by a princess or upper-class women. Ordinary females often wore this costume as a bridal dress during the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties. It is a beautiful attire, colorful and decorated with embroidery.

Hwangpo – day-to-day costume of the king during the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties.

Jebok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials). It is a ritual garment worn for a special ceremony.

Jeogori (tseogori, chogori) – basic upper piece of clothes of the hanbok. It is a unisex garment. It consists of a gil, a git, a dongjeong, a goreum, and sleeves. Jeogori is worn with a skirt or trousers.

Jeokui – religious and formal ceremonial robes of a queen during the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties.

Jeonbok – kid’s traditional long vest.

Jobok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials). Jobok was used for different national festivals and royal celebrations.

Jokduri – small women’s hat that replaced the wigs in the 19th century.

Jokki (tsokki) – Korean traditional vest. It is worn over the jeogori when the weather is cold.

Joseon-oth – the most well-known Korean folk garment. The name “joseon-oth” is used in the North Korea. It is a semi-formal or formal outfit. Male joseon-oth includes a shirt or jacket called “jeogori” and loose-fitting trousers called “baji”. Female joseon-oth includes a blouse or jacket called “jeogori” as well and a skirt called “chima”. In South Korea, this garment is called “hanbok”.

Juchaui – traditional belted overcoat used by both men and women from the Three Kingdoms of Korea period until the late Joseon period. Also, it was called “jumagui”, “po”, or juui”.

Jumagui – traditional belted overcoat used by both men and women from the Three Kingdoms of Korea period until the late Joseon period. Also, it was called “juchaui”, “po”, or juui”.

Jungchimak – traditional outerwear used until the late 19th century. It has very long sleeves, and several slits on the sides and sometimes on the back.

Juui – traditional belted overcoat used by both men and women from the Three Kingdoms of Korea period until the late Joseon period. Also, it was called “jumagui”, “po”, or “juchaui”.

Kkachi durumagi – child’s (mostly boy’s) colorful overcoat. In the past, it was a costume for the Korean New Year; today, it is worn for the celebration of a baby's first birthday. It is called “obangjang durumagi” as well.

Kunghye – shoes for royal women. They are embroidered with floral patterns.

Magoja – outer jacket adopted from the Manchu people in the end of the 19th century. Also called “deot jeogori” or “magwae”.

Magwae – outer jacket adopted from the Manchu people in the end of the 19th century. Also called “deot jeogori” or “magoja”.

Myeonbok – religious and formal ceremonial robes of a king during the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties.

Norigae – traditional Korean female accessory that is hung from the clothing. It is a mix of a good-luck charm and a fashion accessory. It can be one or several knots with tassels made from colorful threads.

Obangjang durumagi – child’s (mostly boy’s) colorful overcoat. In the past, it was a costume for the Korean New Year; today, it is worn for the celebration of a baby's first birthday. It is called “kkachi durumagi” as well.

Onhye – shoes for ordinary married women, as opposed to royal female shoes.

Po (pho) – traditional belted overcoat used by both men and women from the Three Kingdoms of Korea period until the late Joseon period. Also, it was called “jumagui”, “juchaui”, or juui”.

Ramie – traditional Korean handmade fabric used to make clothes.

Sang – traditional wide wrap-around skirt. Usually, it is a rectangular piece of cloth pleated or gathered into a skirt band. It can be also called “chima” or “gun”.

Sangbok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials). It is an official attire for daily usage.

Sangtu – male hairdo; a knot of hair on top of the head.

Seolbim – kids costume; new clothing and shoes worn on Korean New Year.

Sokchima – female underskirt or petticoat worn underneath the chima.

Soksokgot – female undergarment used in day-to-day life in the 19th century. It made the skirt fuller.

Sonjjang – female hair accessory for high class women. It usually has a round shape and plenty of adornments, some of which are shaking and fluttering during walking.

Wonsam – ceremonial overcoat for married upper-class women in the Joseon dynasty.

Yungbok – variant of a gwanbok (formal outfit used by Korean government officials). It is an attire of military Koreans.

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Every culture has features and peculiarities, familiar only to the people of this nation. And it’s very interesting to learn about traditional clothing from natives. That’s why if you have something to say about your national costume, please, do it using comments. Tell us things which you know about your country’s cultural heritage. Other people will discover something new for them thanks to you.

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